45 Life Lessons, written by a 90 year old

45 Life Lessons, written by a 90 year old

By: Alex K. / Source: Kangalex

1. Life isn’t fair, but it’s still good.

2. When in doubt, just take the next small step.

3. Life is too short not to enjoy it.

4. Your job won’t take care of you when you are sick. Your friends and family will.

5. Don’t buy stuff you don’t need.

6. You don’t have to win every argument. Stay true to yourself.

7. Cry with someone. It’s more healing than crying alone.

8. It’s OK to get angry with God. He can take it.

9. Save for things that matter.

10. When it comes to chocolate, resistance is futile.

11. Make peace with your past so it won’t screw up the present.

12. It’s OK to let your children see you cry.

13. Don’t compare your life to others. You have no idea what their journey is all about.

14. If a relationship has to be a secret, you shouldn’t be in it.

15. Everything can change in the blink of an eye… But don’t worry; God never blinks.

16. Take a deep breath. It calms the mind.

17. Get rid of anything that isn’t useful.  Clutter weighs you down in many ways.

(Related: Discover How You Can COMPLETELY Transform Your Life)

18. Whatever doesn’t kill you really does make you stronger.

19. It’s never too late to be happy.  But it’s all up to you and no one else.

20. When it comes to going after what you love in life, don’t take no for an answer.

21. Burn the candles, use the nice sheets, wear the fancy lingerie. Don’t save it for a special occasion. Today is special.

22. Overprepare, then go with the flow.

23. Be eccentric now. Don’t wait for old age to wear purple.

24. The most important sex organ is the brain.

25. No one is in charge of your happiness but you.

26. Frame every so-called disaster with these words, ‘In five years, will this matter?’

27. Always choose Life.

28. Forgive but don’t forget.

29. What other people think of you is none of your business.

(Related: How To Eliminate Your Fear Or Objections With 365 Days Of Blessings)

30. Time heals almost everything. Give Time time.

31. However good or bad a situation is, it will change.

32. Don’t take yourself so seriously. No one else does.

33. Believe in miracles.

34. God loves you because of who God is, not because of anything you did or didn’t do.

35. Don’t audit life. Show up and make the most of it now.

36. Growing old beats the alternative — dying young.

37. Your children get only one childhood.

38. All that truly matters in the end is that you loved.

39. Get outside every day. Miracles are waiting everywhere.

40. If we all threw our problems in a pile and saw everyone else’s, we’d
grab ours back.

41. Envy is a waste of time. Accept what you already have, not what you think you need.

42. The best is yet to come…

43. No matter how you feel, get up, dress up and show up.

44. Yield.

45. Life isn’t tied with a bow, but it’s still a gift.

Develop Your Brand By Telling Your Story

The Power of Thought & Laws of The Universe!- (Law Of Attraction)

The Smart Creative’s Guide to Dressing for Work

With designer labels and high heels, we’ve come a long way since clothing was about nothing more than modesty and warmth. And yet, for many of us, what we wear for work has become automatic and habitual. We drag on a suit each day, out of routine, nothing more. Or we slouch about in baggy casual gear because we’re freelance, or working remotely, so we can.

By dressing mindlessly like this we’re ignoring the large amount of evidence showing the profound effect of clothing on our thinking style, on how we feel, and on the way others perceive us. Starting today, you can use clothing and props to improve your work performance through these simple steps:

Dress for the task: the “Lab Coat” effect

Consider the findings of a study published last year by the Kellogg School of Management. They showed that students were far more accurate on tests of attentional focus and sustained concentration while wearing the white lab coat of a scientist. Crucially, spending time thinking about the lab coat didn’t have this benefit, it had to be worn.

These results suggest that donning symbolic apparel can alter our thinking style in beneficial ways that are consistent with the meaning that the clothing holds for us. So whatever project you’re currently working on, consider dressing for that role. Think what clothing symbolizes the attributes you need to succeed and wear those threads while you work. If there’s nothing as obvious as a lab coat, why not look to role models in your field and see what they wear – perhaps something flamboyant for when you want to be creative, a shirt and tie for when you’re working on the accounts. The important thing is that the clothing has the right symbolic meaning for the work you’re doing. In the study, the white coat had no attentional benefits when the students thought it was a painter’s jacket, not a scientist’s coat.

Be yourself and respect your own style

As well as affecting our mindset, our clothes can also alter how we feel about ourselves. U.S. research published in 2007 found that employees described themselves as feeling more productive, trustworthy, and authoritative when they were wore a business suit at work, but more friendly when wearing casual clothes.

An important detail here was the employees’ style preferences. It was smart types with a clear preference for wearing formal work attire whose feelings of productivity were most adversely affected when they’d worked in an office with a casual dress code. On the other hand, it was hipster staff with a strong preference for laid-back wear who felt most strongly that suits hampered their friendliness and creativity. Of course not all work places give you the freedom to choose, but if you can, these findings show it pays to respect your own style.

The white coat had no attentional benefits when the students thought it was a painter’s jacket.

Choose your weapons (and accessories) wisely

The psychological effects of clothing on performance extend to tools and props. A 2011 study led by Charles Lee at the University of Virginia showed that university students perceived a putting hole to be larger (thus making more putts) when they used a putter that they thought belonged to the pro player Ben Curtis, as compared with a standard putter

Whether it’s a lucky pen handed down from a mentor, or a mouse-mat from your first successful product launch, the symbolic power of the objects we work with is more than mere superstition or sentimentality. Their meaning can alter our mindset and improve our performance. The same principles also apply when choosing what to wear – that lucky tie or necklace really could give you an edge at an interview.

Dress to impress

If you want to appear authoritative it really does make sense to dress smart. A raft of studies have shown that people in more formal attire get served more quickly in shops, have more luck soliciting charity donations, and are usually judged to be more intelligent and academic. A study that looked specifically at female applicants for a managerial job found those who dressed in a smart masculine style were perceived as more forceful and aggressive and were more likely to get hired.

If you can, pay attention to detail. Research published this year using faceless photographs, found that a man dressed in a bespoke suit was rated as more confident, successful, and flexible than a man dressed in an off-the-rack suit. “Minor clothing manipulations can give rise to significantly different inferences,” the researchers said.

This suggests it could be worth going the extra mile when dressing yourself for an important meeting or interview. The same principles also apply when it comes to group image. A survey in 2009 found that business students rated companies with a formal dress code as more authoritative and competent, while those with a more relaxed approach, were seen as more friendly and creative. So if you’re a manager in charge of your organization’s dress code, think about the kind of image you’d like to cultivate. Which leads to the final point …

Studies have shown that people in more formal attire get served more quickly in shops and are usually judged to be more intelligent and academic.

Consider your audience

Formal suits aren’t always the way to go. Research shows that people who wear more daring outfits are perceived as more attractive and individual, which could be advantageous in more creative industries. Casual dress can also be more persuasive, depending on your audience. In 2010, a female experimenter reported that students were far more diligent in following her detailed instructions when she was dressed casually (like they were), as opposed to smart and professional. This similarity effect echoes a study conducted in the early 80s in which experimenters sought a dime for a telephone call. Smartly dressed researchers had more luck at an airport, where more people were dressed formally; casually dressed researchers had more luck at a bus station.

If you need to be persuasive at work, the lesson from these studies is that there’s no single rule for how to dress. You need to balance the power of authority, which you get from smartness, against the allure of camaraderie, which comes from dressing like your audience, and may require going more casual.

The next time you’re getting dressed for work in the morning, be mindful of the psychological impact that clothes can have. Your choice could literally affect your mindset, so try to match your outfit to the type of work you’re planning to do. If interacting with other people is on the cards – consider who they are, the impression you want to make, and especially whether you want to impress them or be one of them. A polished professional look can certainly give you authority. But if you’re collaborating with quirky creatives, or you want to cultivate a friendly atmosphere, you may find it’s advantageous to adopt a more casual, individual style for the day.

More insights on: Office Dynamics

Christian Jarrett

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Dr. Christian Jarrett seeks out exciting new research and showcases its relevance for life. A psychologist turned writer, he’s editor of the British Psychological Society’s Research Digest blog and author of The Rough Guide to Psychology. On Twitter @Psych_Writer.

How to Score the Next BIG Hit: 5 Marketing Tips From Macklemore & Ryan Lewis’ “Thrift Shop”

How to Score the Next BIG Hit: 5 Marketing Tips From Macklemore & Ryan Lewis’ “Thrift Shop”

Written by Lukas Camenzind With over 7 million copies sold, Macklemore & Ryan Lewis’ “Thrift Shop” is one of the highest selling singles of the past few years. But WHY was the song such a huge success? And what can you learn from it if you want to score the NEXT big hit? Here are 5 key insights: 1. It’s A Single Did you know Thrift Shop was the 5th in a series of singles released from The Heist? The first single was “My Oh My” (released December 2010). It completely failed to chart. About a month later came “Wing$” (released January 2011), but it didn’t really catch on either. Then, “Can’t Hold Us” (released August 2011) as the third, and a year later “Same Love” (released July 2012) as the 4th single… …but it wasn’t until AFTER “Thrift Shop” (released August 2012) blew up in October of 2012, that the previous songs climbed the charts, too. So what’s the lesson? Release and promote a series of individual songs. And: If it’s not a hit, switch. Don’t keep pushing a song that’s not getting any traction on its own. Keep releasing new songs until one catches on. 2. It’s Different If you don’t want to drown in the sea of new releases, the first challenge for any (new) artist is: How do you stand out? The simple answer: Be different. “Thrift Shop” IS different: It’s an ode to resourcefulness and getting fabulous even when you can’t afford to touch the luxury items that rappers usually talk about. In fact, it’s the exact OPPOSITE. The lesson: If you want to get noticed, don’t do what everyone else is doing. Dare to be different. You will alienate some, but connect more with others – and that’s what matters in the end. 3. It’s Fun As Jonah Berger shows in his book “Contagious: Why Things Catch On”, funny stories are among the most likely to go viral (because humor is a high-arousal, positive emotion, which makes it highly shareable). And “Thrift Shop” IS a fun song… about a “controversial”, but not-so-serious topic: Whether you are a thrifty-hipster or not, it’s safe to have an opinion and fun to “argue” about it. So, remember: Even if your music isn’t comical, don’t take yourself too serious. Make sure it’s fun to talk about your music, if you want anyone to share it. 4. It’s an Anthem Thrift Shop is not just a song – it’s an anthem. Why? Because the song is a symbol that captures the ACTUAL cultural phenomenon of the cash-strapped hipster (by choice or not), on the hunt for vintage clothes. Here’s the good news: If you want your song to become an anthem, too, you don’t need to start a whole new movement. All you need to do is draft behind a trend that’s ALREADY happening within the audience you want to reach. Write a concept song with a clear and focused message, and you’ll have a better chance of it becoming an huge hit like Thrift Shop. 5. It’s Visual With “Thrift Shop”, the song’s message doesn’t just come across through the music and lyrics: The music video (currently at over 430 million views on You Tube!) communicates the song’s concept visually: It’s fun, different and out-there, and captures what the song is all about. In todays online world (where everyone’s attention span is short), using stunning, extraordinary visuals to go along with your music is crucial. If you want your next song to be a big hit – or at least more successful than your previous song – don’t skimp on the visuals. Now tell me this… Why Do You Think Some Songs Become HUGE Hits? And What Are You Doing To Increase Your Chances Of Scoring The Next One? Leave a comment and let me know! Author Bio: Hi, my name is Luke and I have two passions in life: music and marketing. Have you ever wondered why some artists fail, while others have HUGE success online? If you’re a talented musician, I want to help you reach and engage more fans. To find out why some artists fail while others succeed, download my free report now: http://bit.ly/posteram

How to Score the Next BIG Hit: 5 Marketing Tips From Macklemore & Ryan Lewis’ “Thrift Shop”

Written by Lukas Camenzind With over 7 million copies sold, Macklemore & Ryan Lewis’ “Thrift Shop” is one of the highest selling singles of the past few years. But WHY was the song such a huge success? And what can you learn from it if you want to score the NEXT big hit? Here are 5 key insights: 1. It’s A Single Did you know Thrift Shop was the 5th in a series of singles released from The Heist? The first single was “My Oh My” (released December 2010). It completely failed to chart. About a month later came “Wing$” (released January 2011), but it didn’t really catch on either. Then, “Can’t Hold Us” (released August 2011) as the third, and a year later “Same Love” (released July 2012) as the 4th single… …but it wasn’t until AFTER “Thrift Shop” (released August 2012) blew up in October of 2012, that the previous songs climbed the charts, too. So what’s the lesson? Release and promote a series of individual songs. And: If it’s not a hit, switch. Don’t keep pushing a song that’s not getting any traction on its own. Keep releasing new songs until one catches on. 2. It’s Different If you don’t want to drown in the sea of new releases, the first challenge for any (new) artist is: How do you stand out? The simple answer: Be different. “Thrift Shop” IS different: It’s an ode to resourcefulness and getting fabulous even when you can’t afford to touch the luxury items that rappers usually talk about. In fact, it’s the exact OPPOSITE. The lesson: If you want to get noticed, don’t do what everyone else is doing. Dare to be different. You will alienate some, but connect more with others – and that’s what matters in the end. 3. It’s Fun As Jonah Berger shows in his book “Contagious: Why Things Catch On”, funny stories are among the most likely to go viral (because humor is a high-arousal, positive emotion, which makes it highly shareable). And “Thrift Shop” IS a fun song… about a “controversial”, but not-so-serious topic: Whether you are a thrifty-hipster or not, it’s safe to have an opinion and fun to “argue” about it. So, remember: Even if your music isn’t comical, don’t take yourself too serious. Make sure it’s fun to talk about your music, if you want anyone to share it. 4. It’s an Anthem Thrift Shop is not just a song – it’s an anthem. Why? Because the song is a symbol that captures the ACTUAL cultural phenomenon of the cash-strapped hipster (by choice or not), on the hunt for vintage clothes. Here’s the good news: If you want your song to become an anthem, too, you don’t need to start a whole new movement. All you need to do is draft behind a trend that’s ALREADY happening within the audience you want to reach. Write a concept song with a clear and focused message, and you’ll have a better chance of it becoming an huge hit like Thrift Shop. 5. It’s Visual With “Thrift Shop”, the song’s message doesn’t just come across through the music and lyrics: The music video (currently at over 430 million views on You Tube!) communicates the song’s concept visually: It’s fun, different and out-there, and captures what the song is all about. In todays online world (where everyone’s attention span is short), using stunning, extraordinary visuals to go along with your music is crucial. If you want your next song to be a big hit – or at least more successful than your previous song – don’t skimp on the visuals. Now tell me this… Why Do You Think Some Songs Become HUGE Hits? And What Are You Doing To Increase Your Chances Of Scoring The Next One? Leave a comment and let me know! Author Bio: Hi, my name is Luke and I have two passions in life: music and marketing. Have you ever wondered why some artists fail, while others have HUGE success online? If you’re a talented musician, I want to help you reach and engage more fans. To find out why some artists fail while others succeed, download my free report now: http://bit.ly/posteram

How to Score the Next BIG Hit: 5 Marketing Tips From Macklemore & Ryan Lewis’ “Thrift Shop”

Online Band Marketing & Social Networking Crash Course

his week we are going to take a brief look at the importance for you and your band to be an active member in today’s social networks, as well as some basic brand marketing tips for your band.

In our current society we are constantly glued to our tech devices and continuously downloading massive amounts of data through both our personal computers and mobile devices. In fact, over 488 million people use Facebook over a one month span with numbers growing everyday. With evidence like this it is no wonder that it is so important for artists to “put themselves out there”. Gone are the days of searching the Yellow Pages for a phone number, or buying a map to plot a course for vacation. These tasks and more are easily and efficiently carried out over the internet.

So what are some of these social networks, and which ones do I need?

An all-too-popular answer is: “all of them!” And though I don’t think this is necessary, it certainly doesn’t hurt. Remember, your goal when marketing your music will be to spread your band’s name and music as far as you can, and to everyone you can. The greatest benefit of social networking is the ability to reach millions of potential fans in mere moments, and at little to no cost to you.
Some of the most popular and beneficial social networks used today:

  • Facebook – Ask just about anyone these days, and its pretty likely they have a Facebook account. One of the most popular social networks with over 488+ million users monthly, and over 42 million “Pages”, literally everyone is on Facebook. Though there is a large amount of speculation on whether or not Facebook will stand the test of time, it is clear that this social network will play a large and vital role in your bands social image. Recently Facebook has also added a hashtag (#) feature similar to Twitter which is certain to increase branding for those looking to market and advertise within the network.
  • Twitter – The second most popular social networking site would definitely have to be Twitter. Intended for short bursts of information, it is a great way to reach your audience on a more personal level. Garnering attention through re-tweets is a great way to allow your fans to advertise for you by means of sharing stories with their respective followers. Offering incentives to your followers is a great way to get re-tweets flowing by encouraging fans to do the heavy lifting for you. Though not as popular as Facebook, Twitter still sees about 107 million US users, a great reason to get your band started.
  • Youtube – Though Youtube isn’t exactly a “social network”, many of the features and abilities within the website create enormous potential to reach new audiences all over the world. Apart from having a massive collection of musicians and artists alike posting their work, Youtube has the benefit to post and catalog your music videos which you wish to showcase, as well as the ability to post content related to your brand and music such as concert announcements, backstage features, or video blogs.
  • Google+ – Still fairly new to the social network game, Google started its social networking platform, Google+, in August 2007 and has been growing in users steadily since its opening. Though only about 8% of Americans older than the age of 12 have Google+ accounts, almost 48 percent of Fortune Global 100 companies are now on the new social site and growing in popularity. Fan communities are fond of the new “Circles” feature which allows users to organize groups with similar interests. Probably the most popular reason to have your band’s profile on Google+ is the ability to improve search results on Google’s parent search engine.
  • Soundcloud – Easily known as one of the most popular free websites to host and stream music, since its opening Soundcloud has improved and offered many great features to help musicans and sound artists share their music. Not only can you stream your music here to your fans, your fans will be able to favorite, share and comment on tracks you post.
  • Reverb Nation – Though decreasing popularity in recent months, Reverb Nation is still a popular place for musicians to host their music and share it with fans. Hosting a bokeh of different features and insight to help progress you and your band’s music, Reverb Nation can be a great place to host music and share tour dates with your fans. However, with Facebook’s new linking feature, artists can link their page to their Reverb Nation account quick and easily. By linking the two, artists can then easily share their new music on their page and direct fans to the rest of their catalog through the application.
  • Myspace – Easily one of the least popular social networks today, Myspace used to be the biggest name of the block. Though not used much today, some analysts are predicting a comeback for Myspace with its revamped focus on music. In fact, this past SXSW saw the reemergence of the site as a competitor, with Justin Timberlake endorsing the new site. In order to get a chance at getting into his secret show during SX, eager fans had to create a new account on the site. Though a successful marketing ploy, I am still unconvinced of a Myspace re-emergence.

Continue reading: http://phospheneproductions.blogspot.com/2013/09/online-band-marketing-social-networking.html

Online Brand Marketing & Social Media Crash Course

Service And The Power Of Positivity

Service And The Power Of Positivity

Service And The Power Of Positivity
By Robin Yukiko – August 20th 2012

I ran into an acquaintance who has been out of work for some time. He complains that the market is terrible and how he is sick of this town. He blames politics and says the dating scene sucks here. Then he hands me his card and says if I hear anyone who’s hiring that I should pass along his info.

I knew immediately that I would not.

Now, I’m a nice person. But, even if I met someone in his field, why would I stake my reputation on someone who doesn’t enjoy a single thing about life, where he lives, or anyone he meets? Why would he treat a job any differently?

As my friend and colleague Donovan Plant so eloquently sings, the universe is a yes machine. When you input yeses, it makes more yes. Likewise, when you fuel it with negativity, it malfunctions and serves you sludge.

The music industry is no different. Musicians, whether we acknowledge it or not, are in the service industry. It is a happy circumstance that we enjoy our work (if you don’t, get out while you still can). It is both humbling and empowering that we should serve others with our music.

When you play a wedding, you are providing the soundtrack to the most important day of someone’s life. When you play a piano bar, you are giving someone a reason to get out of their house, making a lonely drink less lonely. When you teach a music lesson to make ends meet, you are providing someone with the knowledge and motivation to make music for himself, empowering him. Even playing in a cover band gives people the experience of hearing their favorite songs live, reminiscing about their youth, or just escaping to something they know the words to.

And when you accept and enjoy the act of giving through your art, you open the doors–in a very real way–to receiving.

In a similar way that pheromones attract others, yes attracts yes. Giving begets giving. And sincere willingness to serve attracts work. Don’t hold grudges. The world has no pity for sour grapes or resentment. Share with others. Don’t be that guy. Be the guy (or gal) that people want to be around.

The universe is a yes machine.
____________________________________________________________________________

Robin Yukiko is a Berklee College of Music grad, singer-songwriter, pianist, and music educator in San Francisco. She hosts the SF Singer-Songwriters’ Workshop at the Musicians Union Local 6. Learn more at www.robinyukiko.com.