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Breaking This One Nasty Cycle Will Change Your Life.

Breaking This One Nasty Cycle Will Change Your Life.

judge

We have all been guilty of passing judgment on both ourselves and others. We judge ourselves for where we’re at in life, or we judge others on their actions and lifestyle choices. In truth, judgement is not a freeing feeling, it confines both us and the people we place judgment upon. On a deeper level, humans operate on vibrations and frequencies. Simply put, we are energy and therefore we are very sensitive to the energy that comes from our thoughts and words. The thoughts we have and the words we speak are much deeper than a simple spoken word or thought, they hold power and affect both us and/or whoever we are speaking to.

Your Thoughts Have Power.

Positive thoughts and words have a similar impact on us. When we share from a place of love, a place that is judgment free, we allow the space for others to let go as well. Whatever is sent out to the universe both positive and negative is absorbed so it is important to be conscious of our thought patterns. If you have ever passed judgement on another and later felt that person knew what you had said or thought, they are simply picking up on the energy you had sent out.

When we judge, we are judging based on our own beliefs and preferences of how someone should act, dress or make their choices. We are all on our own paths, living out our own experience and there should be no judgement towards the way others choose to live out their own journey.

You Don’t Know Their Story.

When a judgemental thought comes up, try to transform that thought and instead come from a place of understanding. There is always more to the story than what you are basing your judgement upon. Having compassion for others and understanding that there is always more going on behind the scenes in people’s personal lives will dramatically shift your life in positive way.

How You Can Break The Cycle.

I challenged myself to one full day without judgement. This meant any time a judgmental thought came to mind,  I was to release it and let it go. This was more difficult than it may seem, mainly because we have been heavily programmed to judge and compare by society, so breaking down that programming was tedious at first.

Because of the lifetime’s worth of programming most of us have been subject to, judgement may continue to rise even if you are making a conscious effort to let go of it. The key is to not judge yourself for these thoughts coming forward but to acknowledge the thought, let it go and not give the thought any power.

Throughout my one day challenge, I still had judgmental thoughts arise but I did not engage in them nor did I voice them. When I did not allow myself to give energy to these thoughts, I could feel a sense of weight lifted off of my shoulders. By the end of the one day challenge I could see and feel the difference in my own energy and in turn that affected the people I was surrounded by. It was without a doubt an enlightening experience.

We are all different people, living our own experiences and navigating through our own daily challenges. So what are we waiting for? Let’s accept that our perspectives are subjective and the potential to truly connect comes from present listening, understanding and empathy.

Try This Yourself.

I challenge you to let go of judgement today and see how it feels to let those thoughts roll off your shoulder rather than to playing into them. Share with us below your own experiences in letting go of judgement!

Much Love!

Check out more articles by this author HERE.

16 Signs That Say You May Be Magnesium Deficient & What To Do About It

16 Signs That Say You May Be Magnesium Deficient & What To Do About It

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Yesterday marked the third time in the last month that I had overheard someone being diagnosed with a magnesium deficiency. The interesting thing is that in all three scenarios (my own included) the symptoms that each individual was exhibiting to prove the deficiency were completely different from one another. Needless to say, this made me curious and led me down a bit of a rabbit hole in further understanding what exactly magnesium is and how it plays a role in our overall health.

What Is Magnesium?

Magnesium is a mineral that is essential to the body for maintaining normal muscle and nerve function. It is involved in over 300 metabolic processes in your body and plays a key role in keeping a healthy immune system, maintaining heart rhythm and building strong bones.(2) Naturally magnesium can be found in a number of seeds (i.e., pumpkin and sunflower), nuts (i.e., almonds and cashews), and even in spinach which packs an average of 79 mg of magnesium per 100 gram serving.

The daily recommended intake of magnesium ranges from 400 to 420 mg in men, 310 to 360 mg in women and 80 to 240 mg in children all depending on age. It is also suggested that when pregnant, women increase their magnesium intake to between 350 and 400 mg depending on the age at which they are pregnant.(1)

Signs That You May Be Deficient

In my case, a magnesium deficiency was identified through the panic and anxiety that I was working through earlier this year. The most prominent time that I would find myself struggling with panic and/or anxiety was at night, the magnesium helped my body to regulate and distribute melatonin more effectively allowing me to get a better night’s sleep. (You can read about some of the other things that have helped me overcome this by clicking HERE)

Here are 16 magnesium deficiency symptoms that Natural Society comprised in an article released in April of last year:

  • Calcium deficiency
  • Poor heart health
  • Weakness
  • Muscle cramps
  • Tremors
  • Nausea
  • Anxiety
  • High blood pressure
  • Type II diabetes
  • Respiratory illness
  • Dizziness
  • Fatigue
  • Potassium deficiency
  • Difficulty swallowing
  • Poor memory
  • Confusion

Sources Of Magnesium

In addition to the seeds, nuts and spinach that I mentioned above, magnesium can also be found in potatoes, tempeh, quinoa and most beans -including black, lima and navy.(4) Like all essential vitamins and minerals, getting an adequate amount of magnesium daily may sound tedious or difficult to incorporate, but it is only as difficult as we choose to make it. The more we hold on to a particular lifestyle or way of eating the more we limit ourselves to habits that feel comfortable on the surface but may be taking a toll on our body. Look out for any of the symptoms listed above and even explore the world of supplements if that is easier for you to incorporate. Based on a recommendation, I incorporated magnesium into my life by taking Anderson’s Concentrated Mineral Drops.

SOURCES:
(1) http://naturalsociety.com/16-magnesium-deficiency-symptoms-signs-low-levels/
(2) http://www.collective-evolution.com/2012/10/30/11-ways-magnesium-helps-your-mind-body/
(3) http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-and-supplements/lifestyle-guide-11/supplement-guide-magnesium
(4) http://www.dietitians.ca/Nutrition-Resources-A-Z/Factsheets/Minerals/Food-Sources-of-Magnesium.aspx 

It’s Everywhere You Turn – See How The Beauty Industry Is Manipulating The Masses & Preying On The Insecure

It’s Everywhere You Turn – See How The Beauty Industry Is Manipulating The Masses & Preying On The Insecure

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Beautiful-Estee-Lauder-Model-Makeup-Estee-Lauder-The-Metallics-New-Pure-Color-Makeup-Video-Tutorials-Get-The-Estee-Lauder-Metallics-Makeup-Look-Metallics-Beauty-Look-1024×490

No matter what country you’re in, France, the UK, Japan, India, or Canada, you are surrounded by it at any given moment. The latest sale, the hottest new look, the ideal body, the only way to ‘fit in’. This overtly westernized image of beauty has become the international standard through the influence of clever marketing and advertising schemes. We are taught that in order to fit into the globalized culture we must fully embrace the western body.

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Vanity-Insanity
Sadly, lighter-colored skin is considered the ideal image of beauty in most countries that contain darker skinned people. The use of skin lightening creams are rampant throughout these countries, pulling in billions of dollars every year. The majority of these products work by eliminating the production of melanin, the natural pigment found in our skin. By the year 2018, it is estimated that the global market for skin lighteners will reach a staggering $20 Billion. But the use of these products don’t come without dangerous risks.

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Skin lightening products are estimated to bring in $20 billion by 2018.
Hydroquinone, a common topical ingredient found in skin lightening creams has been shown to cause leukemia in mice and other animals. The European Union even banned the ingredient in cosmetics in 2001, although it can now be prescribed by a doctor.

In Korea and other Asian countries, blepharoplasty, or eyelid surgery, has become the most common cosmetic procedure. The idea is to create a look that makes the eyes appear more open, similar to the shape of Caucasian eyes. If you look at the models and Anime characters portrayed in Asian magazines and advertisements, it is easy to see the exaggerated size of their eyes and the influence this has on the population.

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Eyelid surgery, known as blepharoplasty, is the most common cosmetic procedure in Asian countries.
Self-Love = No Profit For Beauty Industry
Where do these beauty ideals stem from? The sad part is that the desire to look a certain way doesn’t come from the men and women themselves, it is often imposed on them from the mass media and society at large. Why? Because insecure people make better consumers.

And this isn’t just a female related issue either, men face the same bombardment of chiseled models and beefy sports super-heroes every day. There is a market pin-pointed for every faction of the population.

In truth, if someone were completely happy and confident with how they felt and looked, they wouldn’t feel the need to wear makeup, do their hair, dress fashionable, or pay for expensive and invasive surgeries. These industries would all fail, and this is something they know.

800px-Kami_Parsa_MD_Cosmetic_LowerEyelid_Blepharoplasty

This is why the big companies spend billions on advertising every year. This is why the westernized standard for perfection is pushed in everyone’s faces day-in and day-out. And this is exactly why we need to put an end to these standards.

The Illusionists is a new documentary coming out this year that aims to raise awareness around the vanity-insanity issue currently plaguing our world. Their 4 minute teaser has been going viral around the web and for good reason, I think the timing of this message couldn’t be any more imperative. We can’t wait for the conversation around westernized beauty standards to be at the forefront of international discourse.

What do you guys think, have you ever felt pressured to look a certain way based upon our current westernized standard for attractiveness? Share with us below!

Alien Races Book – English

The blind man who can ‘see’ – and how he shows that humans really DO have a sixth sense

For blind people to regain the power of sight usually requires a miracle  –  either of the old-fashioned, Biblical variety or of the modern, medical sort.

Yet an extraordinary case reported this week shows us that there may be another form of miracle that can help the blind to ‘see’  –  and it’s one that may force us to rethink our whole understanding of the way in which the human senses operate.

In the journal Current Biology it is reported that a man left totally blind by brain damage has astounded scientists by flawlessly navigating an obstacle course without any help or practice whatsoever.

This is perhaps the most persuasive example to date of what is termed ‘blindsight’  –  the extraordinary ability of some who have lost their vision to be able to ‘see’ without, apparently, any ability actually to receive images in the eye and brain at all.

Because blindsight is a nebulous concept, often linked to paranormal manifestations, it has often been dismissed by researchers as myth. Yet here was a case that defied any straightforward explanation.

Scientists at the University of Tilburg in The Netherlands found that the unnamed man, known only as ‘TN’, was able to negotiate his way past a series of boxes and chairs, despite the fact that a series of strokes had damaged the visual cortex of his brain to such an extent that tests have shown he is completely blind.

So how on earth does he do it? What does it tell us about the way we ‘see’ the world?

And is it conclusive proof, as many have claimed, that humans have a hidden ‘sixth sense’ that can detect aspects of the world around us in a way that defies any logical explanation?

The first thing to realise is that science loves to categorise things. We have ‘five senses’ in part because ‘five-and-a-bit senses’ is messy and ‘ unscientific’.

And yet it may be a far more accurate description of what is going on in the complex interface between the outside world and our brains.

It seems that in the case of TN, for example, although he has no conscious awareness of the visual world, his brain is, somehow, keeping tabs on his surroundings, by processing the electrical messages that are travelling through his eyes and optic nerves (which remain undamaged by his stroke) even though the normal ‘visual’ part of his brain is damaged beyond repair.

To use a scientific term, his mind is not creating any visual ‘qualia’  –  the name given to conscious experience of sensations, such as sight or sound.

Although he is not actually aware of the cause, scans have even revealed that certain parts of his brain, not normally associated with sight, ‘light up’ when he is shown pictures of other people pulling a variety of different facial expressions  –  such as fear, anger or joy.

This weirdness should perhaps not surprise us. Our senses form part of the most mysterious system in the known universe  –  the human brain.

Indeed, compared to the kilogram of grey jelly in your skull, even the mightiest stars and galaxies hold few mysteries.

Anyone who claims they know how the brain works, or exactly what is going on when our eyes view a splash of red, or our noses scent a whiff of coffee, or our tastebuds pick up on a tang of brine, is simply deluded or lying. Despite centuries of probing, such mysteries remain totally unsolved.

We do know, however, that there are a number of peculiar anomalies.

For example, we know that humans, compared to other animals, have extremely good vision  –  on a par with the birds and far better than most mammals. Sight is our primary sense.

Yet, rather mysteriously, it is another sense  –  smell  –  which in many of us has the ability to evoke the strongest emotional responses.

Shown a photograph of our old primary school, say, most of us will respond with a vague sense of recognition.

In contrast, even the merest hint of the smell of the school’s polished parquet floors, or of the heady tang of boiled cabbage from the school dinner kitchens, will be enough to bring all the childhood memories flooding back.

Equally mysteriously, our senses seem to operate on several levels. If you are sitting down when you read this article, think for a moment of the sensation coming from your bottom and lower back.

The moment you do, you will become suddenly aware of the pressure of the seat cushion below you, the contours of its shape and how comfortable (or uncomfortable) it is.

In psychological terms, you are now ‘attending’ to these sensory inputs.

Yet before you chose to swivel your ‘mind’s eye’ to the chair, you were probably completely unconscious of all these sensations, even though the relevant one of the your five senses  –  touch  –  was working all the while.

Then there is a well-known psychological phenomenon called the ‘cocktail party effect’.

This is the ability of the human brain to detect, immediately, pertinent and important information from an otherwise meaningless sensory melange.

If you are at a busy party, for instance, you will probably be aware only of the random babble and hum of voices. Yet should someone mention your name, even quietly and from across the room, the chances are that you will immediately pick up on it.

It is as though you have an unconscious monitor sitting inside your head  –  a ‘little man’, if you will  –  checking what is coming in from your eyes and ears and so forth, before deciding which is important-and letting your conscious mind know.

Of course, the idea of a little man inside your head is an absurd (but remarkably persistent) analogy  –  but it does serve to illustrate the fact that our brains operate on all sorts of levels of conscious awareness, and not always in ways that we recognise.

Think of the last time you drove to work, for instance, or did the school run. How conscious were you, actually, of the journey? How many of the twists and turns can you remember?

The chances are that the answer is ‘none at all’; you probably were able to operate, quite safely, a complex piece of machinery (a car) almost like you were an unthinking robot while you were thinking about something more interesting. Extraordinary.

The interaction between the ‘mind’ and the senses really is one of the most amazing aspects of the natural world.

And since we cannot be sure how it works, it does seem foolish to dismiss, out of hand, ‘sixth sense’ phenomena such as blindsight.

It is probably even the case that we should not rush to dismiss, completely out of hand, even stranger ‘paranormal’ mental powers, such as telepathy, even though hard scientific evidence is lacking for such things.

The only certainty is that the more we learn about the workings of the mind, the more fantastical its abilities are proving to be.

STEPHEN HAWKING: How To Build A Time Machine

By: Stephen Hawking / Source: Mail Online

All you need is a wormhole, the Large Hadron Collider or a rocket that goes really, really fast

Hello. My name is Stephen Hawking. Physicist, cosmologist and something of a dreamer. Although I cannot move and I have to speak through a computer, in my mind I am free. Free to explore the universe and ask the big questions, such as: is time travel possible? Can we open a portal to the past or find a shortcut to the future? Can we ultimately use the laws of nature to become masters of time itself?

Time travel was once considered scientific heresy. I used to avoid talking about it for fear of being labelled a crank. But these days I’m not so cautious. In fact, I’m more like the people who built Stonehenge. I’m obsessed by time. If I had a time machine I’d visit Marilyn Monroe in her prime or drop in on Galileo as he turned his telescope to the heavens. Perhaps I’d even travel to the end of the universe to find out how our whole cosmic story ends.

To see how this might be possible, we need to look at time as physicists do – at the fourth dimension. It’s not as hard as it sounds. Every attentive schoolchild knows that all physical objects, even me in my chair, exist in three dimensions. Everything has a width and a height and a length.

But there is another kind of length, a length in time. While a human may survive for 80 years, the stones at Stonehenge, for instance, have stood around for thousands of years. And the solar system will last for billions of years. Everything has a length in time as well as space. Travelling in time means travelling through this fourth dimension.

To see what that means, let’s imagine we’re doing a bit of normal, everyday car travel. Drive in a straight line and you’re travelling in one dimension. Turn right or left and you add the second dimension. Drive up or down a twisty mountain road and that adds height, so that’s travelling in all three dimensions. But how on Earth do we travel in time? How do we find a path through the fourth dimension?

Let’s indulge in a little science fiction for a moment. Time travel movies often feature a vast, energy-hungry machine. The machine creates a path through the fourth dimension, a tunnel through time. A time traveller, a brave, perhaps foolhardy individual, prepared for who knows what, steps into the time tunnel and emerges who knows when. The concept may be far-fetched, and the reality may be very different from this, but the idea itself is not so crazy.

Physicists have been thinking about tunnels in time too, but we come at it from a different angle. We wonder if portals to the past or the future could ever be possible within the laws of nature. As it turns out, we think they are. What’s more, we’ve even given them a name: wormholes. The truth is that wormholes are all around us, only they’re too small to see. Wormholes are very tiny. They occur in nooks and crannies in space and time. You might find it a tough concept, but stay with me.

Nothing is flat or solid. If you look closely enough at anything you’ll find holes and wrinkles in it. It’s a basic physical principle, and it even applies to time. Even something as smooth as a pool ball has tiny crevices, wrinkles and voids. Now it’s easy to show that this is true in the first three dimensions. But trust me, it’s also true of the fourth dimension. There are tiny crevices, wrinkles and voids in time. Down at the smallest of scales, smaller even than molecules, smaller than atoms, we get to a place called the quantum foam. This is where wormholes exist. Tiny tunnels or shortcuts through space and time constantly form, disappear, and reform within this quantum world. And they actually link two separate places and two different times.

Unfortunately, these real-life time tunnels are just a billion-trillion-trillionths of a centimetre across. Way too small for a human to pass through – but here’s where the notion of wormhole time machines is leading. Some scientists think it may be possible to capture a wormhole and enlarge it many trillions of times to make it big enough for a human or even a spaceship to enter.

Given enough power and advanced technology, perhaps a giant wormhole could even be constructed in space. I’m not saying it can be done, but if it could be, it would be a truly remarkable device. One end could be here near Earth, and the other far, far away, near some distant planet.

Theoretically, a time tunnel or wormhole could do even more than take us to other planets. If both ends were in the same place, and separated by time instead of distance, a ship could fly in and come out still near Earth, but in the distant past. Maybe dinosaurs would witness the ship coming in for a landing.

The fastest manned vehicle in history was Apollo 10. It reached 25,000mph. But to travel in time we’ll have to go more than 2,000 times faster

Now, I realise that thinking in four dimensions is not easy, and that wormholes are a tricky concept to wrap your head around, but hang in there. I’ve thought up a simple experiment that could reveal if human time travel through a wormhole is possible now, or even in the future. I like simple experiments, and champagne.

So I’ve combined two of my favourite things to see if time travel from the future to the past is possible.

Let’s imagine I’m throwing a party, a welcome reception for future time travellers. But there’s a twist. I’m not letting anyone know about it until after the party has happened. I’ve drawn up an invitation giving the exact coordinates in time and space. I am hoping copies of it, in one form or another, will be around for many thousands of years. Maybe one day someone living in the future will find the information on the invitation and use a wormhole time machine to come back to my party, proving that time travel will, one day, be possible.

In the meantime, my time traveller guests should be arriving any moment now. Five, four, three, two, one. But as I say this, no one has arrived. What a shame. I was hoping at least a future Miss Universe was going to step through the door. So why didn’t the experiment work? One of the reasons might be because of a well-known problem with time travel to the past, the problem of what we call paradoxes.

Paradoxes are fun to think about. The most famous one is usually called the Grandfather paradox. I have a new, simpler version I call the Mad Scientist paradox.

I don’t like the way scientists in movies are often described as mad, but in this case, it’s true. This chap is determined to create a paradox, even if it costs him his life. Imagine, somehow, he’s built a wormhole, a time tunnel that stretches just one minute into the past.

Through the wormhole, the scientist can see himself as he was one minute ago. But what if our scientist uses the wormhole to shoot his earlier self? He’s now dead. So who fired the shot? It’s a paradox. It just doesn’t make sense. It’s the sort of situation that gives cosmologists nightmares.

This kind of time machine would violate a fundamental rule that governs the entire universe – that causes happen before effects, and never the other way around. I believe things can’t make themselves impossible. If they could then there’d be nothing to stop the whole universe from descending into chaos. So I think something will always happen that prevents the paradox. Somehow there must be a reason why our scientist will never find himself in a situation where he could shoot himself. And in this case, I’m sorry to say, the wormhole itself is the problem.

In the end, I think a wormhole like this one can’t exist. And the reason for that is feedback. If you’ve ever been to a rock gig, you’ll probably recognise this screeching noise. It’s feedback. What causes it is simple. Sound enters the microphone. It’s transmitted along the wires, made louder by the amplifier, and comes out at the speakers. But if too much of the sound from the speakers goes back into the mic it goes around and around in a loop getting louder each time. If no one stops it, feedback can destroy the sound system.

The same thing will happen with a wormhole, only with radiation instead of sound. As soon as the wormhole expands, natural radiation will enter it, and end up in a loop. The feedback will become so strong it destroys the wormhole. So although tiny wormholes do exist, and it may be possible to inflate one some day, it won’t last long enough to be of use as a time machine. That’s the real reason no one could come back in time to my party.

Any kind of time travel to the past through wormholes or any other method is probably impossible, otherwise paradoxes would occur. So sadly, it looks like time travel to the past is never going to happen. A disappointment for dinosaur hunters and a relief for historians.

But the story’s not over yet. This doesn’t make all time travel impossible. I do believe in time travel. Time travel to the future. Time flows like a river and it seems as if each of us is carried relentlessly along by time’s current. But time is like a river in another way. It flows at diff‑erent speeds in diff‑erent places and that is the key to travelling into the future. This idea was first proposed by Albert Einstein over 100 years ago. He realised that there should be places where time slows down, and others where time speeds up. He was absolutely right. And the proof is right above our heads. Up in space.

This is the Global Positioning System, or GPS. A network of satellites is in orbit around Earth. The satellites make satellite navigation possible. But they also reveal that time runs faster in space than it does down on Earth. Inside each spacecraft is a very precise clock. But despite being so accurate, they all gain around a third of a billionth of a second every day. The system has to correct for the drift, otherwise that tiny di‑fference would upset the whole system, causing every GPS device on Earth to go out by about six miles a day. You can just imagine the mayhem that that would cause.

The problem doesn’t lie with the clocks. They run fast because time itself runs faster in space than it does down below. And the reason for this extraordinary e‑ffect is the mass of the Earth. Einstein realised that matter drags on time and slows it down like the slow part of a river. The heavier the object, the more it drags on time. And this startling reality is what opens the door to the possibility of time travel to the future.

Right in the centre of the Milky Way, 26,000 light years from us, lies the heaviest object in the galaxy. It is a supermassive black hole containing the mass of four million suns crushed down into a single point by its own gravity. The closer you get to the black hole, the stronger the gravity. Get really close and not even light can escape. A black hole like this one has a dramatic e‑ffect on time, slowing it down far more than anything else in the galaxy. That makes it a natural time machine.

I like to imagine how a spaceship might be able to take advantage of this phenomenon, by orbiting it. If a space agency were controlling the mission from Earth they’d observe that each full orbit took 16 minutes. But for the brave people on board, close to this massive object, time would be slowed down. And here the e‑ffect would be far more extreme than the gravitational pull of Earth. The crew’s time would be slowed down by half. For every 16-minute orbit, they’d only experience eight minutes of time.

Around and around they’d go, experiencing just half the time of everyone far away from the black hole. The ship and its crew would be travelling through time. Imagine they circled the black hole for five of their years. Ten years would pass elsewhere. When they got home, everyone on Earth would have aged five years more than they had.

So a supermassive black hole is a time machine. But of course, it’s not exactly practical. It has advantages over wormholes in that it doesn’t provoke paradoxes. Plus it won’t destroy itself in a flash of feedback. But it’s pretty dangerous. It’s a long way away and it doesn’t even take us very far into the future. Fortunately there is another way to travel in time. And this represents our last and best hope of building a real time machine.

You just have to travel very, very fast. Much faster even than the speed required to avoid being sucked into a black hole. This is due to another strange fact about the universe. There’s a cosmic speed limit, 186,000 miles per second, also known as the speed of light. Nothing can exceed that speed. It’s one of the best established principles in science. Believe it or not, travelling at near the speed of light transports you to the future.

To explain why, let’s dream up a science-fiction transportation system. Imagine a track that goes right around Earth, a track for a superfast train. We’re going to use this imaginary train to get as close as possible to the speed of light and see how it becomes a time machine. On board are passengers with a one-way ticket to the future. The train begins to accelerate, faster and faster. Soon it’s circling the Earth over and over again.

To approach the speed of light means circling the Earth pretty fast. Seven times a second. But no matter how much power the train has, it can never quite reach the speed of light, since the laws of physics forbid it. Instead, let’s say it gets close, just shy of that ultimate speed. Now something extraordinary happens. Time starts flowing slowly on board relative to the rest of the world, just like near the black hole, only more so. Everything on the train is in slow motion.

This happens to protect the speed limit, and it’s not hard to see why. Imagine a child running forwards up the train. Her forward speed is added to the speed of the train, so couldn’t she break the speed limit simply by accident? The answer is no. The laws of nature prevent the possibility by slowing down time onboard.

Now she can’t run fast enough to break the limit. Time will always slow down just enough to protect the speed limit. And from that fact comes the possibility of travelling many years into the future.

Imagine that the train left the station on January 1, 2050. It circles Earth over and over again for 100 years before finally coming to a halt on New Year’s Day, 2150. The passengers will have only lived one week because time is slowed down that much inside the train. When they got out they’d find a very diff‑erent world from the one they’d left. In one week they’d have travelled 100 years into the future. Of course, building a train that could reach such a speed is quite impossible. But we have built something very like the train at the world’s largest particle accelerator at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland.

Deep underground, in a circular tunnel 16 miles long, is a stream of trillions of tiny particles. When the power is turned on they accelerate from zero to 60,000mph in a fraction of a second. Increase the power and the particles go faster and faster, until they’re whizzing around the tunnel 11,000 times a second, which is almost the speed of light. But just like the train, they never quite reach that ultimate speed. They can only get to 99.99 per cent of the limit. When that happens, they too start to travel in time. We know this because of some extremely short-lived particles, called pi-mesons. Ordinarily, they disintegrate after just 25 billionths of a second. But when they are accelerated to near-light speed they last 30 times longer.

It really is that simple. If we want to travel into the future, we just need to go fast. Really fast. And I think the only way we’re ever likely to do that is by going into space. The fastest manned vehicle in history was Apollo 10. It reached 25,000mph. But to travel in time we’ll have to go more than 2,000 times faster. And to do that we’d need a much bigger ship, a truly enormous machine. The ship would have to be big enough to carry a huge amount of fuel, enough to accelerate it to nearly the speed of light. Getting to just beneath the cosmic speed limit would require six whole years at full power.

The initial acceleration would be gentle because the ship would be so big and heavy. But gradually it would pick up speed and soon would be covering massive distances. In one week it would have reached the outer planets. After two years it would reach half-light speed and be far outside our solar system. Two years later it would be travelling at 90 per cent of the speed of light. Around 30 trillion miles away from Earth, and four years after launch, the ship would begin to travel in time. For every hour of time on the ship, two would pass on Earth. A similar situation to the spaceship that orbited the massive black hole.

After another two years of full thrust the ship would reach its top speed, 99 per cent of the speed of light. At this speed, a single day on board is a whole year of Earth time. Our ship would be truly flying into the future.

The slowing of time has another benefit. It means we could, in theory, travel extraordinary distances within one lifetime. A trip to the edge of the galaxy would take just 80 years. But the real wonder of our journey is that it reveals just how strange the universe is. It’s a universe where time runs at different rates in different places. Where tiny wormholes exist all around us. And where, ultimately, we might use our understanding of physics to become true voyagers through the fourth dimension.

 

Gandhi’s 10 Best Ways to Change the World for the Better

Gandhi’s 10 Best Ways to Change the World for the Better

Source: How To Manifest A Miracle?

Mahatma Gandhi is a renowned figure in world history. His dedication to the principles of peacefulness is legendary and he was able to accomplish many great things in his life. He is the man who led his Indian people to gain their independence from British rule in 1947, and the philosophy of the man lives on in the hearts of many to this day. Gandhi’s ideas were simple and came from a positive place in his heart, mind and soul. Below we list the ten best ideas or pieces of advice we can glean from Gandhi to change our world for the better.

1. Learn to forgive your friends as well as your enemies.

This is a principle you can find in many religions, and the intent and concept behind it come from love and a desire to abstain from violence and negative thoughts. When you are wronged or hurt by another the natural response may be to lash out or seek revenge. So many times we hear of jilted lovers doing terrible things in the heat of passion or friendships ending due to misunderstandings.

“The weak can never forgive. Forgiveness is an attribute of the strong.”

It does take a certain strength to forgive someone who has wronged you. Realize that revenge will not erase the wrong that was done, it will only create more hurt. Do not let yourself become a part of a vicious cycle of revenge. Listen to these famous words from Gandhi himself:

“An eye for an eye only ends up making the whole world blind.”

Revenge is a cyclical thing. Once you carry out your vengeance, you will bring more negativity and wrong down upon your head. If you can search within and find the strength to forgive your friends and foes alike, then that is far more admirable and better for the world.

2. Realize that no one is perfect.

Perfection is an ideal that no man can realistically attain. We are all flawed beings despite our best intentions. It takes a humble sprit to continue to become better and better. The way to achieve this is through admitting your mistakes and learning from them as best you can.

“I claim to be a simple individual liable to err like any other fellow mortal. I own, however, that I have humility enough to confess my errors and to retrace my steps.”

With a spirit of humility you can see where you went wrong. You can’t let pride blind you in this regard. To do so would be to never truly evolve. The same mistakes would continually pop up in your life because you never properly learn your lesson.

3. To thine own self be true.

Yes, that line was from the famous Shakespeare play Hamlet. The words of Gandhi speak to us and say that we would do well to align our thoughts, actions and words. In doing so we stay true to ourselves.

“Happiness is when what you think, what you say and what you do are in harmony.”

If more people were truly happy it would make the world a better place. Negativity in the world often comes from a bitter spirit, jealousy and hate. Happiness embodies all of the great things about the world such as love, prosperity and justice. When you are not afraid to do what you are thinking and the words coming out of your mouth ring true you are living your life as you see fit. To be true to yourself is a great thing. Follow your heart and let all facets of your being be guided by it.

4. Understand you are in control of your own life.

Sometimes people blame others for their misfortune. They try to find a convenient scapegoat so that they don’t have to feel bad about their failures. This isn’t a healthy way to think of things though and it leads to a bad place. It must be understood that each human is in control of his or her life. Certainly other people can influence you in many ways. Even if others lead you down a bad path the choice was yours to follow that individual.

“Nobody can hurt me without my permission.”

Gandhi understood that ultimately each person is responsible for their choices and actions in life. Be mindful of this when living your life and it will help you to want to make the best decisions possible. If you follow the crowd and do not like where you end up, you were still in control of what you were doing. Forge your own path in life, and have a smile on your face when you reach your destination.

5. You must change yourself to change the world.

The world is not always exactly how we want it to be. Sitting at home and hoping things will get better one day will do little or nothing towards making that a reality. In order to change the world people need to change themselves. The healing starts at home so to speak.

“You must be the change you wish to see in the world.”

If the world were to change and you were to do nothing to change yourself, you would still be a part of the problem. We must seek to continually change our world by making it a little bit better as time flows forward. By inspiring change in your person you can inspire those around you. Simple things such as treating others with kindness, being slow to anger and accepting others for who they are regardless of personal prejudices are great ways to start.

6. Ideas need action to give them meaning.

Ideas are an incredible thing. Concepts such as democracy, freedom and justice look great on paper or in an individual’s head. What if those ideas had never come to fruition though? Without action the ideas are just pretty thoughts floating in the air. Action is what can bring an idea to life and help change our surroundings for the better.

“An ounce of practice is worth more than tons of preaching.”

Letting your ideas be known is positive in its’ own way, but showing people how they work through individual action is the way to go. Dialogue is a part of the process of initiating changes, but ideas must be put into practice. Get out there and start that neighborhood watch to try to deter the heightening crime rate in your neighborhood. Put your ideas and words to good use.

7. Understand that we live in the present.

The past and future are great concerns for many. People look to the past longingly for times that they cherished. They worry about the future for the sake of their children, wondering what type of world we are leaving to them. In order to honor the memory of the past and ensure the future is a great one to leave to our children, we must live in the present.

“I do not want to foresee the future. I am concerned with taking care of the present. God has given me no control over the moment following.”

The present moment in time is the one we have control over. We can change the way things are now by living our lives as best we can. We can mold the future through our actions now, but if we do nothing but think about times past and times to come the moment will pass us by. There is no going back to a moment in time. Let your mind live in the here and now.

8. Possess the spirit to endure.

Things in life that are worth achieving often do not come in the blink of an eye. Having a spirit that is willing to endure tough times and continue to strive forward is an important quality in achieving great things in this world. One cannot give up due to not getting the result they want the first time out of the gate.

“First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win.”

Being an individual who will persist in the pursuit of your ideals or goals can win you the day. Those who oppose your progress will fall by the wayside while you remain unwavering. It is the person with the most resolve who gets their desire.

9. See the good in your fellow man.

No person is without their faults. Understanding that all human beings are prone to being imperfect, we must see the good in our fellow man. By helping one another and promoting good will the whole world’s situation can improve.

“I look only to the good qualities of men. Not being faultless myself, I won’t presume to probe into the faults of others.”

By understanding that we all have things we wish to improve on, we can help each other live fuller lives. Humanity never would have come as far as it has if not for men working together to build civilization to this point. Our continued partnerships and relationships will propel us forward for years to com. It is important to get along with each other and to be accepting. When you are with a person understand the goodness within them. Don’t judge them for what they aren’t, form a bond with what they are.

10. Continually evolve and grow.

We possess the abilities to learn, increase our skills and come to a better understanding of so many different things. It is important not to be stagnant in life, because only by continuing to improve one’s self can one keep up with the changing world around us.

“Constant development is the law of life, and a man who always tries to maintain his dogmas in order to appear consistent drives himself into a false position.”

If you are a man who is unwilling to adapt you will not last in the world. Certainly elasticity is a great quality to possess. Rigidity of belief and expectations can be a person’s undoing. Continually be willing to learn new things and change accordingly.

If you find the above article “Gandhi’s 10 Best Ways to Change the World for the Better”… enlightening and insightful

You need to read “How To Manifest A Miracle”

1 Absolutely “Weird” Trick Turns Your Mind Into A Natural Money Magnet

Source: The Science of Getting Rich by Wallace Wattles

“Since belief is all important, it behooves you to guard your thoughts; and as your beliefs will be shaped to a very great extent by the things you observe and think about, it is important that you should command your attention.

And here the will comes into use; for it is by your will that you determine upon what things your attention shall be fixed.

If you want to become rich, you must not make a study of poverty.

Things are not brought into being by thinking about their opposites. Health is never to be attained by studying disease and thinking about disease; righteousness is not to be promoted by studying sin and thinking about sin; and no one ever got rich by studying poverty and thinking about poverty.

Related: How To Release Your Undiscovered Millionaire Mind!

Medicine as a science of disease has increased disease; religion as a science of sin has promoted sin, and economics as a study of poverty will fill the world Do not talk about poverty; do not investigate it, or concern yourself with it.

Never mind what its causes are; you have nothing to do with them. What concerns you is the cure.”

“Do not spend your time in charitable work, or charity movements; all charity only tends to perpetuate the wretchedness it aims to eradicate.

I do not say that you should be hard hearted or unkind, and refuse to hear the cry of need; but you must not try to eradicate poverty in any of the conventional ways. Put poverty behind you, and put all that pertains to it behind you, and “make good.”

Giving-to-the-Poor Opportunities are multiplied when seized – Sun Tzu, Art of War

And you cannot hold the mental image which is to make you rich if you fill your mind with pictures of poverty.

Do not read books or papers which give circumstantial accounts of the wretchedness of the tenement dwellers, of the horrors of child labor, and so on. Do not read anything which fills your mind with gloomy images of want and suffering.

You cannot help the poor in the least by knowing about these things; and the wide-spread knowledge of them does not tend at all to do away with poverty.”

Related: The Truest, Easiest and Purest Way To Get Rich

“What tends to do away with poverty is not the getting of pictures of poverty into your mind, but getting pictures of wealth into the minds of the poor.

You are not deserting the poor in their misery when you refuse to allow your mind to be filled with pictures of that misery.

Poverty can be done away with, not by increasing the number of well to do people who think about poverty, but by increasing the number of poor people who purpose with faith to get rich.”

The poor do not need charity; they need inspiration.

Charity only sends them a loaf of bread to keep them alive in their wretchedness, or gives them an entertainment to make them forget for an hour or two; but inspiration will cause them to rise out of their misery.

If you want to help the poor, demonstrate to them that they can become rich; prove it by getting rich yourself.

People must be taught to become rich by creation, not by competition. Every man who becomes rich by competition throws down behind him the ladder by which he rises, and keeps others down; but every man who gets rich by creation opens a way for thousands to follow him, and inspires them to do so.

You are not showing hardness of heart or an unfeeling disposition when you refuse to pity poverty, see poverty, read about poverty, or think or talk about it, or to listen to those who do talk about it.

Use your will power to keep your mind OFF the subject of poverty, and to keep it fixed with faith and purpose ON the vision of what you want.”

An Awesome Way to Make Kids Less Self-Absorbed (PARENTS THIS IS GOOD!)

I’ve been inspired by recent news stories of children who are working to make a difference in the world, committed to projects much bigger than themselves. There’s Malala Yousufzai, the young advocate for girls’ education in Pakistan; Craig Kielburger, who advocates for the abolishment of child labor; and Ryan Hreljac, who raises money to build wells in developing countries. The list goes on and on.

But there’s a flip side to these stories. Research suggests that some young people in the United States are actually becoming more self-absorbed and less connected to others.

A recent study that examined the empathy levels of almost 14,000 university students between 1979 and 2009 found that students have become dramatically less empathic over the years, particularly since 2000.

In addition, narcissism, which correlates negatively with empathy, is on the rise amongst university-aged students. Narcissists, by definition, are extremely self-focused and tend to see other people in terms of their usefulness rather than true friendship—not exactly a recipe for empathy.

What’s more, a 2006 survey showed that 81 percent of 18- to 25-year-olds think getting rich is an important goal, and 64 percent think it’s the most important goal. Sadly, only 30 percent believe that helping others in need is important.

While these studies focused on university students and young adults, the findings suggest that somewhere in their earlier development, they weren’t cultivating the skills needed to connect with others.

So how can teachers help students avoid the joyless path of self-absorption and instead cultivate a life in which they feel part of something larger than themselves—one of the keys to a meaningful life?

There are, of course, many strong programs that have been designed to help students develop empathy and positive relationships.

But new research suggests another way: awe.

Very little is known about the experience of awe; however, several new studies, many conducted by the GGSC’s Dacher Keltner, have shown awe to be a potentially powerful positive emotion that might just help our students develop empathy.

Here’s how it works:

When we see a grand vista in nature such as Victoria Falls, or experience an inspiring work of art such as Beethoven’s “Ode to Joy” or Michelangelo’s Pieta, or ponder the phenomenal inner strength of a great soul like Gandhi who non-violently led India to independence, we often feel two things: 1) a sense of vastness that gives us 2) a new perspective on the world and our place in it. This is awe.

Dacher’s lab has found that awe makes us feel very small and like we’re in the presence of something greater than ourselves. We also may lose awareness of our “self” and feel more connected to the world around us.

Imagine the potential of this life-changing emotion for students—and, in particular, for our hyper-self-focused teens! Since adolescence is a crucial period for identity-formation, some researchers have suggested that adolescence is a particularly important time to experience awe—it could help them see themselves as deeply connected to the world around them, not the center of it. Inducing the uplifting experience of awe could also be a positive way to keep narcissism in check.

While scientists haven’t yet examined if this temporary loss of self-focus directly impacts empathy levels, they do know that awe makes people feel less impatient and more inclined to volunteer their time to help others—strong evidence that it makes them feel more connected and committed to something bigger than themselves.

So can teachers actually create awe-inducing experiences for their students?

Absolutely! In an experiment to see if awe could be elicited, Dacher and his team had one group of university students look at a Tyrannosaurus Rex skeleton and another group look down a long hallway. On a follow-up survey, the only difference between the groups was that members of the T-Rex group felt like they were part of a larger whole—a defining feature of awe.

It’s probably not too difficult to imagine something that might induce awe in teens, or kids of any age; I’ve named a few examples above. Stories of exceptional modern-day figures such as Nelson Mandela (consider his ability to forgive) or pictures of the universe such as the birth of a star may be engaging and effective—especially if you find the subject matter to be awe-inspiring. Many teachers already bring content like this into the classroom, and this research on awe validates that approach and suggests it should be tried with more frequency and focus.

Here are two important points to remember if you want to expose your students to awe-filled experiences:

1) Not all students will get it. Dacher has found that some people are more prone to awe than others—usually the ones who are comfortable changing how they see the world. So, if you’ve got some students who seem immovable, don’t fret. If nothing else, they’re still learning about “awesome” art, music, nature, and people.

2) Help students process what they’ve experienced. Awe requires what psychologist Jean Piaget called “accommodation”—the process of changing our mental models to incorporate something to which we’ve recently been exposed. Discussing and writing about experiences of awe will help students understand and process at a deeper level what they’ve just felt.

Awe is not a term heard very often in schools, but its potential is vast. Think of the enthusiasm and wonder and joy that awe-filled experiences could bring to our students—experiences that could not only help them out of the narcissistic funk of adolescence, but also put them on a path to a life lived in compassionate connection with others. Awesome!


This article is printed here with permission. It originally appeared on Greater Good, the online magazine of the Greater Good Science Center (GGSC). Based at UC Berkeley, the GGSC studies the psychology, sociology, and neuroscience of well-being, and teaches skills that foster a thriving, resilient, and compassionate society.